Tuesday, July 23, 2013


The Christian life is not a life of clear sailing. Every believer is going to have bad days, no matter how holy he may be. Most Christians know Jesus isn't just a "good times only" savior. He is with us not only when things are going well, but during our bad days also. When hard times hit us, He doesn't disappear, saying, "I'll be back when you've got it all worked out." No, He's faithful and caring through every season.

The apostle Paul addresses this when he writes, "We have this treasure in earthen vessels, that the excellency of the power may be of God, and not of us" (2 Corinthians 4:7). The treasure Paul refers to is the knowledge and presence of Jesus Christ.

The Greek word Paul uses for earthen is "frail clay," meaning "weak, easily broken, easily tempted." He is saying, "Yes, we hold Jesus' presence in our very bodies. But our bodies are weak, easily tempted and easily broken."

The fact is, we all suffer what the Bible calls "infirmities." For many Christians, a common infirmity of life is a frail constitution or poor health. Paul spoke of Timothy's frequent illnesses, calling them "often infirmities" (1 Timothy 5:23). The Greek word infirmity here means "sickly, without strength, feeble of body or mind."

Yet there are other infirmities besides physical ones, and they are just as difficult to handle. In my opinion, infirmities of the mind are probably the most widespread. I'm talking about those unexplainable times when your feelings betray you and play tricks on your mind. Let me explain.

Guilt, fear and anxiety are all infirmities of the mind. You might be haunted because of your past or because of some sin that still clings to your life. And these infirmities cannot but help affect your feelings.

If you are undergoing this kind of trial, you must understand that you are not being unspiritual while enduring such attacks. You are still the child of your heavenly Father, and He won't let you fight alone. He will send the Holy Spirit to chase away all your doubts. Don't try to argue with the devil, because you can't prove anything to him. Instead, when the next attack comes, run to your heavenly Father. Then stand still—with patience and hope!