Tuesday, August 31, 2010

HE CALLS US TO SEE IT THROUGH

"Which of you, intending to build a tower, sitteth not down first, and counteth the cost, whether he have sufficient to finish it? Lest haply, after he hath laid the foundation, and is not able to finish it, all that behold it begin to mock him, saying, This man began to build, and was not able to finish" (Luke 14:28–30).

Christ knew many of his followers would not have what it took to see them through. He knew they would turn back and not finish the race. I believe this is the most tragic condition possible for a believer—to have started out fully intending to lay hold of Christ, to grow into a mature disciple and become more like Jesus and then to drift away. Such a person is the one who laid a foundation and could not finish because he did not first count the cost.

What a joy it is to meet those who are indeed finishing the race! These believers are growing in the wisdom and knowledge of Christ. They are changing daily, from moment to moment. Paul says to them encouragingly, "We all, with open face beholding as in a glass [mirror] the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord" (2 Corinthians 3:18). It is not heaven these believers seek, but Christ in his glory!

I know that many who read this particular message are in the process of pausing or taking a step backward. It may seem like a small step, but it will cause a swift descent away from his love. If this is true of you, realize the Holy Spirit is calling you all the way back—back to repentance, self-denial and surrender. And at this very moment, time is a big factor. If you ever intend to lay hold of Christ, do it now; see it through!

Monday, August 30, 2010

EXPECT 2010

World Challenge will be hosting their first EXPECT: Church Leaders Conference in Colorado Springs from September 14–16, 2010. Speakers include:

Gary Wilkerson
The Springs Church

Nicky Cruz
Nicky Cruz Outreach

Jim Cymbala
Brooklyn Tabernacle

Carter Conlon
Times Square Church

Claude Houde
Église Nouvelle Vie

For more information, and to register, visit our EXPECT 2010 conference page.

LOVE AND HATE

"If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple" (Luke 14:26).

The Greek word for hate means "to love less by comparison." Jesus is calling us to have a love for him that is so all-inclusive, fervent and absolute that all our earthly affections cannot come close.

Think about it: Do we know what it is like to come into his sweet presence and ask nothing? To reach out to him only because we are grateful that he loves us so completely?

We have become selfish and self-centered in our prayers: "Give us…meet us…bless us…use us…protect us." All this may be scriptural, but the focus remains on us. Even our work for the Lord has become selfish. We want him to bless our service to him, so we can know our faith is genuine. The Lord is more interested in what we are becoming in him than in what we are doing for him.

Someone reading this may be hurting because doors of ministry have closed. He or she may feel "put on the shelf." Someone else may think he would be more useful to the Lord on some needy mission field. But I say we cannot be more useful to the Lord than when we minister love to him in the secret closet of prayer. When we seek the Lord, when we search his Word endlessly to know him, then we are at the peak of our usefulness. We do more to bless and satisfy God by being shut up with him in loving communication than by doing anything else. Whatever work he might open up for us to do, at home or abroad, will flow effortlessly out of our communion with him. He is more interested in winning our whole hearts than in our winning the world for him.

This is not to demean fervent soul-winning labors, but to state that all Spirit-blessed evangelism is birthed in communion. The witness who is often with the Lord in prayer will be given the wisdom, the Holy Ghost timing, and the power to do the will of God.

Saturday, August 28, 2010

EXPECT 2010 Church Leadership Conference

World Challenge will be hosting their first EXPECT: Church Leaders Conference in Colorado Springs from September 14–16, 2010. Speakers include Gary Wilkerson of The Springs Church, Nicky Cruz of Nicky Cruz Outreach, Jim Cymbala of Brooklyn Tabernacle, Carter Conlon of Times Square Church, and Claude Houde of Église Nouvelle Vie.

EXPECT is a simple conference with a profound expectation: that in these few days your life and ministry will be infused with a new and fresh faith to expect and attempt greater things.

Imagine what could happen if we put aside our small hopes, nagging self-doubts, and dreamless existence and became engaged in revolutionary faith. If something in us is transformed and we begin to unwaveringly expect from God the greatest things imaginable, our lives will never be the same.

Imagine churches that truly expect God to transform their cities.

Imagine pastors who fully expect to be used by God to raise up prevailing churches in their cities.

Imagine leaders who totally expect God to fill them with fresh vision to take their ministers into uncharted territories of godly exploits.

Through God’s favor (expectation) and relentless pursuit of a singular mission (that the world might know him), we will see great things!

Please let your pastors and church leaders know about this conference. They can find more information and register on our EXPECT 2010 Conference page.

Friday, August 27, 2010

COMING TO HIS TABLE

An old gospel song has profound meaning for me. It says, “Jesus has a table spread / Where the saints of God are fed / He invites his chosen people, come and dine.”

What an exciting prospect: The Lord has spread a table in the heavenlies for his followers! Jesus told his disciples, “I appoint unto you a kingdom, as my Father hath appointed unto me; that ye may eat and drink at my table in my kingdom” (Luke 22:29–30). Hungering for him means that, by faith, we also are seated at this table.

When the apostle Paul instructs, “Let us keep the feast” (1 Corinthians 5:8), he means let us understand clearly that we have been assigned a seat in the heavenlies with Christ at his royal table. Paul is saying, “Always show up. Never let it be said your seat is empty.”

The sad truth is that the church of Jesus Christ simply does not comprehend what it means to keep the feast. We do not understand the majesty and honor accorded us by having been raised by Christ to sit with him in heavenly places. We have become too busy to sit at his table. We mistakenly derive our spiritual joy from service instead of communion. We do more and more for a Lord whom we know less and less. We run ourselves ragged giving our bodies and minds to his work, but we seldom keep the feast.

The one thing our Lord seeks above all else from his servants, ministers and shepherds is communion at his table. This table is a place for spiritual intimacy, and it is spread daily. Keeping the feast means coming to him continually for food, strength, wisdom and fellowship.

Ever since the Cross, all spiritual giants have had one thing in common: They revered the table of the Lord. They became lost in the vastness of Christ. They all died lamenting that they still knew so little of him and his life.

Our vision of Christ today is too small, too limited. A gospel of “vastness” is needed to overcome the complicated and growing problems of this wicked age. You see, God does not merely solve problems in this world—he swallows them up in his vastness! Someone with an increasing revelation of Christ’s vastness need fear no problem, no devil, no power on this earth. He knows that Christ is bigger than it all. If we had this kind of revelation of how vast he is, how boundless, measureless, limitless and immense, we would never again be overwhelmed by life’s problems.

Paul is an example to us. He was committed to having such an ever-increasing revelation of Christ. In fact, all he had of Christ came by revelation; it was taught to him at the Lord’s table and made truth to him by the Holy Spirit. Remember, it was three years after his conversion before Paul went to spend time with the apostles in Jerusalem, and he stayed with them only fifteen days before continuing his missionary journeys. He later said, “By revelation he made known unto me the mystery” (Ephesians 3:3). The Holy Spirit knows the deep and hidden secrets of God, and Paul prayed constantly for the gift of grace to understand and preach “the unsearchable riches of Christ” (Ephesians 3:8).

The Lord is looking for believers who are not satisfied with sifting through all the conflicting voices to find a true word. He wants us to hunger for a revelation of him that is all our own—a deep, personal intimacy.

Thursday, August 26, 2010

FROM THE BATTLEFIELD OF FAITH

When Paul decided to go to Jerusalem, it wasn’t because he’d heard revival was breaking out there. He wasn’t a discouraged preacher looking for someone to impart something of God to him. No—he states clearly, “I went up…to Jerusalem…by revelation and communicated unto them that gospel which I preach” (Galatians 2:1–2). Paul went to Jerusalem to share a mystery that God wanted to reveal to his people.

This godly man had his own full, glorious revelation of Christ. He didn’t learn the doctrines he preached by shutting himself in a study with books and commentaries. He wasn’t some isolated philosopher who dreamed up theological truths, thinking, “Someday my works will be read and taught by future generations.”

Let me tell you how and where Paul produced his epistles. He wrote them in dark, damp prison cells. He wrote them while wiping the blood from his back after being scourged. He wrote them after crawling from the sea, having survived another shipwreck.

Paul knew that all the truth and revelation he taught came from the battlefield of faith. And he rejoiced in his afflictions for the gospel’s sake. He said, “Now I can preach with all authority to every sailor who’s been through a shipwreck, to every prisoner who’s been locked up with no hope, to everybody who has ever looked death in the face. God’s Spirit is making me a tested veteran, so I can speak his truth to everyone who has ears to hear.”

God hasn’t turned you over to the power of Satan. No—he’s allowing your trial because the Holy Spirit is performing an unseen work in you. Christ’s glory is being formed in you for all eternity.

You’ll never get true spirituality from someone or something else. If you’re going to taste God’s glory, it’s going to have to come to you right where you are—in your present circumstances, pleasant or unpleasant.

I believe one of the great secrets of Paul’s spirituality was his readiness to accept whatever condition he was in without complaining. He writes, “I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content” (Philippians 4:11).

The Greek word for content here means “to ward off.” Paul is saying, “I don’t try to protect myself from my unpleasant circumstances. I don’t beg God for relief from them. On the contrary, I embrace them. I know from my history with the Lord that he’s doing something eternal in me.”

“That ye may be able to bear it…” (1 Corinthians 10:13). The word bear which Paul uses here implies that our condition isn’t going to change. The point is for us to bear up under the situation. Why? God knows that if he changes our condition, we’ll end up destroyed. He allows us to suffer because he loves us.

Our part in every trial is to trust God for all the power and resources we need to find contentment in the midst of our suffering. Please don’t misunderstand me—being “content” in our trials doesn’t mean we enjoy them. It simply means we no longer try to protect ourselves from them. We are content to stay put and endure whatever is handed to us, because we know our Lord is conforming us to the image of his Son.

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

THE PRESENT GENERATION KNOWS NOTHING ABOUT ENDURANCE

To endure means “to carry through despite hardships; to suffer patiently without giving up.” In short, it means to hold on or hold out. But this word means little to the present generation. Many Christians today are quitters—they quit on their spouses, their families and their God.

Peter addresses this subject by saying, “This is thankworthy, if a man for conscience toward God endure grief, suffering wrongfully” (1 Peter 2:19). Then he adds, “What glory is it, if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, ye shall take it patiently? But if, when ye do well, and suffer for it, ye take it patiently, this is acceptable with God. For even hereunto were ye called: because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps: who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth: who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered, he threatened not; but committed himself to him that judgeth righteously: who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed. For ye were as sheep going astray; but are now returned unto the Shepherd and Bishop of your souls” (1 Peter 2:20–23).

The apostle Paul commands, “Thou therefore endure hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus Christ” (2 Timothy 2:3). Finally, the Lord himself gives us this promise: “He that shall endure unto the end, the same shall be saved” (Matthew 24:13).

I ask you—what is your hardship? Is your marriage in turmoil? Is your job in crisis? Do you have a conflict with a relative, a landlord, a friend who has betrayed you?

We are to take hope. You see, just as Paul’s suffering never let up, neither did his revelation, his maturity, his deep faith, his settled peace. He said, “If I’m going to be a spiritual man—if I really want to please my Lord—then I can’t fight my circumstances. I’m going to hold on and never quit. Nothing on this earth can give me what I get from God’s Spirit every day in my trial. He’s making me a spiritual man.”

Paul’s life “breathed” with the Spirit of Christ. And so it is with every truly spiritual person. The Holy Ghost pours forth out of that servant’s inner being the heavenly breezes of God. This person isn’t downcast; he doesn’t murmur or complain about his lot. He may be going through the trial of his life, but he’s still smiling—because he knows God is at work in him, revealing his eternal glory.

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

A PERSONAL REVELATION OF CHRIST

If you are a preacher, missionary or teacher, think about this: What are you teaching? Is it what a person taught you? Is it a rehashing of the revelation of some great teacher? Or have you experienced your own personal revelation of Jesus Christ? If you have, is it ever-increasing? Is heaven opened to you?

Paul said, "In him we live, and move, and have our being" (Acts 17:28). True men and women of God live within this very small yet vast circle. Their every move, their entire existence, is wrapped up only in the interests of Christ. Years ago I knew the Holy Spirit was drawing me into such a ministry, one that preached Christ alone. Oh, how I yearned to preach nothing but him! But my heart was unfocused, and I found the circle too narrow. As a result, I had no flow of revelation to sustain my preaching.

To preach Christ, we must have a continuous flow of revelation from the Holy Spirit. Otherwise, we will end up repeating a stale message. If the Holy Spirit knows the mind of God and searches the deep and hidden things of the Father, and if he is to well up as flowing water within us, then we must be available to be filled with that flowing water. We must stay filled up with a never-ending revelation of Christ. Such revelation awaits every servant of the Lord who is willing to wait on him, believing and trusting the Holy Spirit to manifest to him the mind of God.

Paul said Christ was being revealed in him, not just to him (see Galatians 1:16). In God's eyes it is unfruitful to preach a word that has not already worked its power in the preacher's life and ministry. It may seem all right for certain shallow ones to preach Christ with contention—but not so for the man or woman of God. We must preach an ever-increasing revelation of Christ, yet only as that revelation effects a deep change in us.

Paul also voiced a personal concern: "Lest…when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway" (1 Corinthians 9:27). Paul certainly never would have doubted his security in Christ; that was not in his mind here. The Greek word used for castaway means "unapproved" or "not worthy." Paul dreaded the thought of standing before the judgment seat of Christ to be judged for preaching a Christ he did not really know or for proclaiming a gospel he did not fully practice. This is why Paul speaks so often of the "living Christ" or "Christ living in me."

We cannot continue another hour calling ourselves servants of God until we can answer this question personally: Do I truly want nothing but Christ? Is he truly everything to me, my one purpose for living?

Is your answer yes? If you mean it, you will be able to point to a dung heap of your life, the one that Paul spoke of when he said, "I…do count them but dung, that I may win Christ" (Philippians 3:8). Have you counted all things as loss for the revelation of him? If you want nothing but Christ, then your ministry is not a career—your ministry is prayer! You will not have to be prodded to seek him; you will go often to your secret closet, knowing that the moment you walk in you are seated at his table. You will worship him, sitting in his presence unhurried, loving him, praising him with upraised hands, yearning after him and thanking him for his wisdom.

Monday, August 23, 2010

A PERFECT HEART IS TRUSTING

The Psalmist wrote, "Our fathers trusted in thee: they trusted, and thou didst deliver them. They cried unto thee, and were delivered: they trusted in thee, and were not confounded" (Psalm 22:4-5).

The Hebrew root word for trust suggests "to fling oneself off a precipice." That means being like a child who has climbed up into the rafters and cannot get down. He hears his father say, "Jump!" and he obeys, throwing himself into his father's arms. Are you in such a place right now? Are you on the edge, teetering, and have no other option but to fling yourself into the arms of Jesus? You have simply resigned yourself to your situation, but that is not trust; it is nothing more than fatalism. Trust is something vastly different from passive resignation. It is active belief!

As we hunger for Jesus more intensely, we will find that our trust in him is well founded. At some point in our lives we may have thought that we could not really trust him—that he did not really have control over the big picture and that we had to stay in charge. But growing closer to him and getting to know him better changes that. It means that we do not just come to him for help when we are at the end of our rope; instead, we begin to walk with him so closely that we hear him warning of the trials ahead.

The trusting heart always says, "All my steps are ordered by the Lord. He is my loving Father, and he permits my sufferings, temptations and trials—but never more than I can bear, for he always makes a way of escape. He has an eternal plan and purpose for me. He has numbered every hair on my head, and he formed all my parts when I was in my mother's womb. He knows when I sit, stand or lie down because I am the apple of his eye. He is Lord—not just over me, but over every event and situation that touches me."

A perfect heart is also a broken heart!

The Psalmist David said, "The Lord is nigh unto them that are of a broken heart; and saveth such as be of a contrite [crushed] spirit" (Psalm 34:18).

Brokenness means more than sorrow and weeping, more than a crushed spirit, more than humility. True brokenness releases in the heart the greatest power God can entrust to mankind—greater than power to raise the dead or heal sickness and disease. When we are truly broken before God, we are given a power that restores ruins, a power that brings a special kind of glory and honor to our Lord.

You see, brokenness has to do with walls—broken down, crumbling walls. David associated the crumbling walls of Jerusalem with the brokenheartedness of God's people. "The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart…. Do good in thy good pleasure unto Zion: build thou the walls of Jerusalem. Then shalt thou be pleased with the sacrifices of righteousness" (Psalm 51:17–19).

Nehemiah was a brokenhearted man, and his example has to do with those broken walls of Jerusalem (see Nehemiah 2:12–15). In the dark of the night, Nehemiah "viewed the wall." The Hebrew word shabar is used here. It is the same word used in Psalm 51:17 for "broken heart." In the fullest Hebrew meaning, Nehemiah's heart was breaking in two ways. It broke first with anguish for the ruin, and second with a hope for rebuilding (bursting with hope).

This is truly a broken heart: one that first sees the church and families in ruin and feels the Lord's anguish. Such a heart grieves over the reproach cast on the Lord's name. It also looks deep inside and sees, as David did, its own shame and failure. But there is a second important element to this brokenness, and that is hope. The truly broken heart has heard from God: "I will heal, restore and build. Get rid of the rubbish, and get to work rebuilding the breaches!"

Friday, August 20, 2010

WALKING WITH GOD

“Enoch walked with God” (Genesis 5:24). The original Hebrew meaning for walked implies that Enoch went up and down, in and out, to and fro, arm in arm with God, continually conversing with him and growing closer to him. Enoch lived 365 years—or, a “year” of years. In him, we see a new kind of believer. For 365 days each adult year, he walked arm in arm with the Lord. The Lord was his very life—so much so that at the end of his life, he did not see death (see Hebrews 11:5).

Like Enoch, who was translated out of life, those who walk closely with God are translated out of Satan’s reach—taken out of his kingdom of darkness and put into Christ’s kingdom of light: “Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son” (Colossians 1:13).

Enoch learned to walk pleasingly before God in the midst of a wicked society. He was an ordinary man with all the same problems and burdens we carry, not a hermit hidden away in a wilderness cave. He was involved in life with a wife, children, obligations and responsibilities; Enoch wasn’t “hiding to be holy.”

“Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him” (Genesis 5:24). We know from Hebrews that this verse speaks of Enoch’s translation, the fact that he did not taste death. But it also means something deeper. The phrase he was not, as used in Genesis 5, also means “he was not of this world.” In his spirit and in his senses, Enoch was not a part of this wicked world. Each day as he walked with the Lord he became less attached to the things below. Like Paul, he died daily to this earthly life and he was taken up in his spirit to a heavenly realm.

Yet while he walked on this earth, Enoch undertook all his responsibilities. He cared for his family: he worked, ministered and occupied. But “he was not”—not earthbound. None of the demands of this life could keep him from his walk with God.

Hebrews 11:5 says clearly: “Before his [Enoch’s] translation he had this testimony, that he pleased God.” What was it about Enoch that pleased God so much? It was that his walk with God produced in him the kind of faith God loves. These two verses cannot be separated: “Before his [Enoch’s] translation he had this testimony, that he pleased God. But without faith it is impossible to please him” (Hebrews 11:5-6). We hear this latter verse often, but rarely in connection with the former. Yet throughout the Bible and all of history those who walked closely with God became men and women of deep faith. If the church is walking with God daily, communing with him continually, the result will be a people full of faith—true faith that pleases God.

All around Enoch, mankind grew increasingly ungodly. Yet as men changed into wild beasts full of lust, hardness and sensuality, Enoch became more and more like the One with whom he walked.

“By faith Enoch was translated.” This is an incredible truth, almost beyond our comprehension. All of Enoch’s faith was focused on the one great desire of his heart: to be with the Lord. And God translated him in answer to his faith. Enoch could no longer bear to stand behind the veil; he just had to see the Lord.

Our brother Enoch had no Bible, no songbook, no fellow member, no teacher, no indwelling Holy Spirit, no rent veil with access to the Holy of Holies. But he knew God!

“He that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him” (Hebrews 11:6). How do we know that Enoch believed God was a rewarder? Because we know that is the only faith that pleases God—and we know that Enoch pleased him! God is a recompenser, a remunerator, that is, one who pays well for faithfulness. How does the Lord reward his diligent ones?

There are three important rewards that come by believing God and walking with him in faith.

1. The first reward is God’s control of our lives. The person who neglects the Lord soon spins out of control as the devil moves in and takes over. If only he would fall in love with Jesus, walking and talking with him! God would soon show him that Satan has no real dominion over him and this person would quickly allow Christ to control him.

2. The second reward that comes by faith is having “pure light.” When we walk with the Lord, we are rewarded with light, direction, discernment, revelation—a certain “knowing” that God gives us.

3. The third reward that comes with a walk of faith is protection from all our enemies. “No weapon that is formed against thee shall prosper” (Isaiah 54:17). In the original Hebrew, this verse is translated as: “No plan, no instrument of destruction, no satanic artillery shall push you or run over you, but it will be done away with.”

Thursday, August 19, 2010

AN EXAMPLE OF GOD’S PURPOSE IN OUR TAKING SPOILS

While David and his army were away, the Amalekites raided his village of Ziklag. These marauding invaders took all the women and children and burned down the whole town. When David returned, he “was greatly distressed; for the people spake of stoning him…but David encouraged himself in the Lord his God” (1 Samuel 30:6).

Talk about spiritual warfare! This wasn’t just an attack against David. It was an all-out assault against God’s eternal purpose. Once again, the devil was after God’s seed.

This is the focus of all spiritual warfare: The enemy has always been determined to destroy the seed of Christ. And that fact hasn’t changed even 2000 years after the Cross. Satan is still out to destroy God’s seed, and he does this by attacking us, the seed of Christ. David felt threatened when he heard the grumbling of his men. But David knew his heart was right with God, and Scripture says he encouraged himself in the Lord. Immediately, this man of faith took off in pursuit of the Amalekites. And he quickly overtook them, rescuing every person and possession that had been taken (see 1 Samuel 30:19–20). David not only recovered what was taken from Ziklag but everything else the Amalekites had plundered.

What did David do with all these spoils of war? He used them to maintain the purposes of God. In addition, he sent gifts of the spoils to the elders of Judah and to the towns where he and his men had been hiding (see 1 Samuel 30:26 and 31). This is another example of God’s purpose in our spiritual warfare. We’re to take spoils from battle not just for ourselves, but for the body of Christ. The resources we gain are meant to bring blessing to others.

The Syrian army besieged the city of Samaria during a famine. The Syrians simply camped outside the city, waiting for the Samaritans to starve. Conditions got so bad within the city walls, a donkey’s head sold for eighty pieces of silver. Things grew so desperate that women were offering their children to be boiled for food. It was sheer insanity (see 2 Kings 6).

Four lepers who lived outside the city walls finally said to themselves, “Why sit we here until we die?…Now therefore come, and let us fall unto the host of the Syrians: if they save us alive, we shall live; and if they kill us, we shall but die” (2 Kings 7:3–4). So they set out for the Syrian camp.

When they arrived, everything was deathly still. Not a soul was in sight. So they searched every tent, but everyone was gone. Scripture explains: “The Lord had made the host of the Syrians to hear a noise of chariots, and a noise of horses, even the noise of a great host: and they said one to another, Lo, the king of Israel hath hired against us the kings of the Hittites, and the kings of the Egyptians, to come upon us. Wherefore they arose and fled in the twilight, and left their tents, and their horses…even the camp as it was, and fled for their life” (7:6–7).

When the lepers realized this, they went throughout the camp eating and drinking and then they went back to the city and called out, “Come with us. You won’t believe it, but the Syrians have fled their camp” (see 7:10). The Lord turned the whole situation around. He took the spoils of warfare and used them to restore and refresh his people, maintaining his cause on earth.

Are you getting the picture? Are you beginning to understand the reason for your present battle? Those who put their trust in the Lord are promised glorious victory over all power of the enemy. God wants you to know, “Yes, you’ll come through victorious. But I am going to make you more than an overcomer. I’m working out an even greater purpose in you for my kingdom. You’ll come out of this battle with more spoils than you can handle.”

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

THE SPOILS OF SPIRITUAL WARFARE

“Out of the spoils won in battles did they dedicate to maintain the house of the Lord” (1 Chronicles 26:27). This verse opens to us a profound, life-changing truth. It speaks of spoils that can only be won in battle. And once these spoils are won, they are dedicated to the building up of God’s house.

I believe if we grasp the powerful truth behind this verse, we’ll understand why the Lord allows intense spiritual warfare throughout our lives. Many Christians think once they’re saved, their struggles are over, that life will be smooth sailing. Nothing could be further from the truth. God not only allows our battles, but he has a glorious purpose for them in our lives.

What are “spoils of warfare”? Spoils are plunder, loot, goods taken in battle by the victors. The Bible first mentions spoils in Genesis 14, when a confederation of kings invaded Sodom and Gomorrah. These invaders captured the inhabitants and plundered their possessions: “They took all the goods of Sodom and Gomorrah…. And they took Lot, Abram’s brother’s son” (Genesis 14:11–12).

When Abram learned that his nephew Lot was taken captive, he gathered his 318-man army of servants and pursued the enemy kings. Scripture says he overtook the invaders and “smote them…. And he brought back all the goods, and also brought again his brother Lot, and his goods, and the women also, and the people” (14:15–16).

Picture victorious Abram here. He was leading a long procession of joyful people, and wagons piled high with goods of all kinds. And along the way, he met Melchizedek, king of Salem. Scripture tells us Abram was moved to tithe to this king of all his plunder (see 14:20). “Consider how great this man was, unto whom even the patriarch Abraham gave the tenth of the spoils” (Hebrews 7:4).

Here is the principle God wants us to lay hold of: Our Lord is interested in much more than making us victors. He wants to give us spoils, goods, spiritual riches from our warfare. We’re to emerge from battle with wagonloads of resources. This is what Paul refers to when he says, “We are more than conquerors through him that loved us” (Romans 8:37, italics mine).

David had a reverent attitude toward spoils taken in warfare. We see it in a decree he set forth toward the end of his life. David had just appointed his son Solomon to follow him on Israel’s throne. And now he gathered the nation’s leaders together to set up a divine order for sustaining God’s house. What resources would they use for this holy work? “Out of the spoils won in battles did they dedicate to maintain the house of the Lord” (1 Chronicles 26:27).

Let me set the scene. After every military victory, David took back spoils and stockpiled them in abundance: gold, silver, brass, timber, money too vast to count. And he had one purpose in mind: to use these spoils as resources for building the temple.

When Scripture speaks of maintaining the temple, the original Hebrew means “to repair the house, to strengthen and consolidate what was built.” These resources were meant to maintain the temple’s original splendor.

Where is God’s temple today? It’s made up of his people—you, me, his church worldwide. According to Paul, our bodies are temples of the Holy Ghost. And, like ancient Israel, our Lord still maintains his temple through spoils gained in battle. That’s why our trials are meant for more than just our survival. Through every battle, God is laying aside riches, resources, wealth for us. He’s stockpiling a whole treasury of goods from our warfare. And those spoils are dedicated to building up and maintaining his body, the church of Jesus Christ.

Think about it: For years after Solomon built the temple, it was maintained in good order by the spoils taken in past wars. God’s house remained vibrant and alive, because his people had emerged from every conflict not just victorious, but rich in resources. We find this principle of “supply through battle” throughout God’s Word.

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

THAT WHICH IS SPIRITUAL CANNOT BE DUPLICATED

Here on the streets of New York City, you can buy a Rolex watch for fifteen dollars. As every New Yorker knows, these watches aren’t truly Rolexes. They are simply “knock-offs”—cheap copies of the original.

There seems to be a duplicate for just about everything today. But there is one thing that cannot be duplicated and that is true spirituality. Nothing that is truly spiritual can be copied. The Lord recognizes the work of his own hands—and he won’t accept a man-made duplication of any of his divine workings. Why? Because it’s impossible for man to duplicate what is truly spiritual. That is the work of the Holy Spirit alone. He’s constantly at work doing something new in his people. And there is no possible way for us to reproduce that work.

This is the big mistake of modern religion. We think if we merely impart knowledge of the Scriptures and biblical principles to people, they’ll become spiritual. But the fact remains—no person or institution has the power to produce spirituality in someone. Only the Holy Ghost does that.

Very little of the work God’s Spirit does in us can be seen. This is why truly spiritual people rarely look for outward evidence of his work. Paul says, “We look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen” (2 Corinthians 4:18).

In the context of this passage, Paul is speaking of sufferings and afflictions. He saying, “No one knows all the things we face, except the Holy Spirit. And this is where true spirituality is manifested—in the crucible of suffering.”

Those who submit to the leading of God’s Spirit—who face their afflictions confident that the Lord is producing something in them—emerge from their crucible with strong faith. And they testify that the Spirit taught them more during their suffering than when all was well in their lives.

In all my years of walking with the Lord, I’ve rarely seen an increase in my spirituality during good times. Rather, any such increase usually took place as I endured hard places, agonies, testings—all of which the Holy Ghost allowed.

At one point in his walk of faith, Paul said, “The Holy Spirit solemnly testifies to me that bonds and afflictions await me” (see Acts 20:21–22). Indeed, throughout Paul’s entire life, his afflictions never let up. They just kept coming.

“Our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory” (2 Corinthians 4:17). According to Paul, our afflictions and difficulties produce eternal values in us. He’s saying, “The suffering we go through on this earth will probably last our whole lifetime. But that’s only momentary compared to eternity. And right now, as we endure afflictions, God is producing in us a revelation of his glory that will last forever.”

Monday, August 16, 2010

WINNING CHRIST

“I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ” (Philippians 3:8).

Paul was completely captivated by his Lord. Why would he feel the need to “win” Christ? Christ already had revealed himself clearly, and not just to the apostle but in his life. Yet, even so, Paul felt compelled to win Christ’s heart and affection.

Paul’s entire being—his ministry, life and very purpose for living—was focused only on pleasing his Master and Lord. All else was rubbish to him, even “good” things.

Is this scriptural, you may ask, this idea of winning the heart of Jesus? Aren’t we already the objects of God’s love? Indeed, his benevolent love extends to all mankind. But there is another kind of love that few Christians ever experience. It is an affectionate love with Christ such as occurs between a husband and wife.

This love is expressed in the Song of Solomon. In that book Solomon is portrayed as a type of Christ and in one passage the Lord speaks of his bride this way:

“Thou hast ravished my heart…my spouse; thou hast ravished my heart with one [look] of thine eyes, with one chain of thy neck. How fair is thy love…my spouse! How much better is thy love than wine!” (Song of Solomon 4:9-10).

The bride of Christ consists of a holy people who long to be so pleasing to their Lord, and who live so obediently and so separated from all other things, that Christ’s heart will be ravished. The word ravish in this passage means to “unheart” or to “steal my heart.” The King James Version of the above passage says that Christ’s heart is ravished with just “one eye.” I believe that “one eye” is the singleness of a mind focused on Christ alone.

Friday, August 13, 2010

MORE PRECIOUS THAN GOLD

The story of Queen Esther is one of intense warfare, one of the greatest spiritual battles in all of Scripture. The devil was trying to destroy God’s purpose on earth, this time through the evil Haman. This wealthy, influential man persuaded the king of Persia to declare an edict calling for the death of every Jew under his rule, from India to Ethiopia.

The first Jew in Haman’s sight was righteous Mordecai, Esther’s uncle. Haman had a gallows built especially for Mordecai, but Esther intervened, calling God’s people to prayer and laying her life on the line to countermand Haman’s order. God exposed the wicked scheme, and Haman ended up hanging on his own gallows. The king not only reversed the death order, but he gave Haman’s house to Esther, an estate worth millions by today’s standards.

Yet Haman’s mansion wasn’t the only spoil taken in this story. Scripture tells us, “The Jews had light, and gladness, and joy, and honour” (Esther 8:16). These were the true spoils gained in battle with the enemy.

You see, our trials not only gain us spiritual riches, they keep us strong, pure, under continual maintenance. As we put our trust in the Lord, he causes our trials to produce in us a faith more precious than gold. “That the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of gold that perisheth, though it be tried with fire, might be found unto praise and honour and glory at the appearing of Jesus Christ” (1 Peter 1:7).

“Having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it” (Colossians 2:15).

Jesus plundered the devil at Calvary, stripping him of all power and authority. When Christ rose victorious from the grave, he led an innumerable host of redeemed captives out of Satan’s grasp. And that blood-bought procession is still marching on.

Amazingly, Christ’s triumph at Calvary gave us even more than victory over death. It gained for us incredible spoils in this life: grace, mercy, peace, forgiveness, strength, faith, all the resources needed to lead an overcoming life. He has made every provision for the maintaining of his temple: “Christ as a son over his own house; whose house are we, if we hold fast the confidence and the rejoicing of the hope firm unto the end” (Hebrews 3:6).

The Holy Spirit is showing us a marvelous truth here: Jesus has supplied us with all the resources we need, in his Holy Ghost. But we are responsible for tapping into that treasury to maintain his temple. And the resources for maintaining the temple have to come directly from the spoils of our warfare.

Christ has given us everything necessary for this maintenance to take place. He has adopted us into his household. He stands as the cornerstone of the house and he has cleaned the entire house. Finally, he has given us access to the very Holy of Holies. So, by faith, we are now a fully established, complete temple. Jesus didn’t build a house that’s only half finished. His temple is complete.

This temple has to be maintained. It must be kept in good repair at all times. Of course, we know where the resources can be found: in the Spirit of Christ himself. He is the treasurer of all spoils. Those resources are released when we see our need and we cooperate with God.

That cooperation begins when we are in the midst of conflict. Our resources are the Christlikeness we win while immersed in battle. They’re the lessons, the faith, the character we gain from warfare with the enemy. There is value in the battle. And we can be confident that good will come out of it.

Thursday, August 12, 2010

TAKE HOLD OF YOUR TRIAL BY FAITH

If we didn’t have conflict, pressure, trials, wars, we would become passive and lukewarm. Decay would set in and our temple would lie in ruins. We wouldn’t be able to handle the territory we’ve gained. That’s why the enemy’s plan against us is clear: He wants to take us out of the battle. His aim is to remove all the fight from us.

We find all our resources for maintenance—strength to go on, power over the enemy—in our spiritual battles. And on that day when we stand before the Lord, he will reveal to us: “Do you remember what you went through on that occasion? And in that awful battle? Look at what you accomplished through it all. It was all secured through the battles you won.”

The simple fact is, God has put his treasure in human bodies. He has made you a temple, a house for his Spirit to dwell in. And you have a responsibility to maintain that temple. If you become lazy and careless, neglecting the maintenance work needed—regular prayer, feeding on God’s Word, fellowshipping with the saints—decay will set in. And you’ll end up in absolute ruin.

As I look back on my own fifty years of ministry, I recall many times when it would have been easy for me to quit. I would pray, “Lord, I don’t understand this attack. Where did it come from? And when will it end? I don’t see any purpose in it at all.” But over time, I began to see fruit from those trials. And that fruit—resources, strength, spiritual wealth—supplied me in a way I couldn’t have gotten through any other means.

I urge you: Take hold of your trial by faith, and believe God has allowed it. Know that he’s using it to make you stronger…to help you take spoils from Satan...to make you a blessing to others…and to sanctify it all to his glory.

“But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, that the excellency of the power may be of God, and not of us. We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed; we are perplexed, but not in despair” (2 Corinthians 4:7-9).

“For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory; while we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things that are not seen are eternal” (2 Corinthians 4:17-18).

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

NEVER BEING INTIMIDATED

If you walk in the Spirit, you will constantly be harassed by demonic powers. But you do not have to be intimidated by any demon power—anywhere, at any time!

Paul was continually harassed by demonic powers. He was preaching on the isle of Paphos when demons attempted to interfere: “…a false prophet, a Jew, whose name was Barjesus…withstood them, seeking to turn away the deputy from the faith” (Acts 13:6–8).

Barjesus means “son of Jesus” or “angel of light.” This was the devil standing up against Paul! But the Holy Ghost welled up inside of the apostle: “Then Saul…filled with the Holy Ghost…said…thou child of the devil, thou enemy of all righteousness, wilt thou not cease to pervert the right ways of the Lord? And now, behold, the hand of the Lord is upon thee, and thou shalt be blind, not seeing the sun for a season. And immediately there fell on him a mist and a darkness; and he went about seeking some to lead him by the hand. Then the deputy, when he saw what was done, believed, being astonished at the doctrine of the Lord” (Acts 13:9–12).

Paul, “filled with the Holy Ghost,” brought down all the powers of darkness!

It is not enough to be grieved by the attempts of Satan to harass you! In Acts 16 Paul was grieved—meaning “disturbed, troubled.” He allowed it for many days, but the Spirit of God welled up in Paul, and he said to the demon power, “That’s it—that’s enough! In the name of Jesus, be gone!” (See Acts 16:16–18.)

Beloved, we take too much from the devil! There comes a time when we, too, must stand up in the power of the Holy Ghost and say, “Enough—that’s it, I command you in Jesus’ name to go!”

When you take authority and command devils to flee, Satan will come at you with everything in his arsenal. Just after Paul had cast the demons out of the possessed girl in Acts 16:16–18, Satan started stirring things up. He enflamed the crowd against Paul and Silas—and suddenly they were in a terrible crisis!

The city magistrates had them whipped and cast into prison. And with every stripe on their backs, I can hear the devil saying, “So you think you’ve won the victory? You think you’re going to cast out my demons and take authority over me?”

The devil didn’t seem to know that the more you whip a servant of God who walks in the Spirit, the more praise you whip up from him! If you throw him in a crisis, tie him up with problems and troubles, he’ll sing, shout and worship!

“And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sang praises unto God: and the prisoners heard them” (Acts 16:25).

If we are to walk in the Spirit, then we must believe God for supernatural deliverance from every bondage of Satan. It doesn’t matter if God has to create an earthquake to do it. That is exactly what he did for Paul:

“And suddenly there was a great earthquake, so that the foundations of the prison were shaken: and immediately all the doors were opened, and every one’s bands were loosed” (v. 26).

Satan will try to bring upon you the most dreadful temptation or trial you have ever faced. He wants you to get bogged down in guilt, condemnation, self-examination. Dear saint, you have to arise in the Spirit and get your eyes off your circumstances and bondage. Don’t try to figure it all out. Start praising, singing and trusting God—and he will take care of your deliverance!

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

HIGHER MEANING OF WALKING IN THE SPIRIT

In 1 Samuel 9 we see that Saul was sent by his father to find some runaway donkeys. Taking a servant with him, Saul searched throughout the land. Finally, he got discouraged and was ready to give up the hunt. Then his servant told him about Samuel, a seer; maybe he could tell him where to find the donkeys.

Samuel, here, is a type of the Holy Spirit, who knows the mind of God; he has more on his mind than just direction. He knows Saul has been chosen by God to play a part in heaven’s eternal purposes!

The first thing Samuel did when Saul arrived was to call for a feast (see 1 Samuel 9:19). This is exactly what the Holy Spirit desires of us: to sit at the Lord’s table and minister to him—having quality time alone, hearing his heart.

Samuel asked Saul to clear his mind so they could commune together (1 Samuel 9:20–25). Samuel was saying, “Don’t focus on getting direction now—that’s all settled. There’s something more important at hand. You’ve got to know God’s heart—his eternal purposes!”

After that night of communion, Samuel asked Saul to send his servant out of the room, so they could have an intimate, face-to-face session (see 1 Samuel 9:27; 10:1).

Do you see what God is saying here? “If you really want to walk in the Spirit—if you really want my anointing—you need to seek more than direction from me. You need to come into my presence and get to know my heart, my desires! You see, I want to anoint you—to use you in my kingdom!”

Beloved, forget direction—forget everything else for now! Allow the Holy Spirit to teach you the deep hidden things of God. Stand still in his presence, and let him show you the very heart of the Lord. That is the walk of the Spirit in the highest form!

Spending time in the presence of the Lord produces a manifestation of Christ to a lost world.

“We faint not…but by manifestation of the truth commending ourselves to every man’s conscience in the sight of God” (2 Corinthians 4:1–2). The apostle Paul states that we’re called to be a manifestation of truth. Of course, we know Jesus is the truth. So, what does Paul mean by saying that we’re to manifest Jesus?

Paul is speaking here of a visible expression. A manifestation is a “shining forth” that makes something clear and understandable. In short, Paul is saying we’re called to make Jesus known and understood to all people. In each of our lives, there should be a shining forth of the very nature and likeness of Christ.

Paul takes this concept of manifesting Christ even further. He says, we actually are God’s letters to the world: “Ye are our epistle written in our hearts, known and read of all men…the epistle of Christ…written not with ink, but with the Spirit of the living God; not in tables of stone, but in fleshy tables of the heart” (2 Corinthians 3:2–3). Our lives are letters written by the Holy Ghost and sent out to a lost world. And we’re being read continually by those around us.

How exactly do we become God’s letters to the world? It happens only by the work of the Spirit. At the moment we’re saved, the Holy Ghost imprints in us the very image of Jesus. And he continues shaping this image in us at all times. The Spirit’s mission is to form in us an image of Christ that’s so truthful and accurate, it will actually pierce people’s consciences.

Monday, August 9, 2010

HOW CAN YOU OBTAIN A WALK IN THE SPIRIT?

The command to walk in the Spirit is given to all—not just a few super-saints! Here is how you can obtain this walk: “This I say then, Walk in the Spirit…” (Galatians 5:16).

1. You must go after this walk with everything in you! First, ask the Holy Spirit to be your guide and friend.

“Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you” (Luke 11:9).

If you are saved, the Holy Spirit has already been given to you. Now ask him to take over—surrender to him! You have to determine in your heart that you want him to lead and guide you. Moses, speaking of the latter days, said, “But if from thence thou shalt seek the Lord thy God, thou shalt find him, if thou seek him with all thy heart and with all thy soul” (Deuteronomy 4:29).

2. Focus on knowing and hearing the Spirit—and get your eyes off your trouble and temptation. Paul, Silas and Timothy would have wallowed in fear and depression if they had focused on their troubles. Instead, they focused on God—praising and worshiping him.

Most of the time when we go to prayer, we focus on past failures. We replay our defeats time after time, saying, “Oh, how far up the road I could be if I hadn’t failed God and messed up in my past.”

Forget everything in your past! It’s all under the blood! And forget about the future, too, because only the Lord knows what’s ahead. Instead, focus only on the Holy Spirit, with your whole mind and heart.

3. Give much quality time to communion with the Holy Spirit. He will not speak to anyone who is in a hurry. Wait patiently. Seek the Lord and minister praises to him. Take authority over every other voice that whispers thoughts to you. Believe that the Spirit is greater than these, and that he will not let you be deceived or blinded.

“Greater is he that is in you, than he that is in the world” (1 John 4:4).

Friday, August 6, 2010

GOD LOVES YOU!

The Father loves you—it is at this point that multitudes of believers fail God. They are willing to be convicted of sin and failure, over and over again. But they will not allow the Holy Ghost to flood them with the love of the Father.

The legalist loves to live under conviction. He has never understood the love of God or allowed the Holy Spirit to minister that love to his soul.

We at Times Square Church have taught that the righteous person, the true lover of Jesus, loves reproof. He learns to welcome having the Holy Spirit expose all his hidden areas of sin and unbelief—because the more he deals with sin, the happier and freer he becomes.

Yet, the attitude I see in many Christians is: “Keep on judging me, Lord—convict me, rebuke me!” This is not the same thing as true conviction. For example, I see this in many responses to my newsletter messages. When I write a message that thunders with judgment, I get overwhelmingly approving responses.

When I share about the sweetness and love of Jesus, I receive letters saying, “You’re not preaching the truth anymore!” It is as though these people are saying, “If you’re not reproving, then what you’re saying can’t be the gospel.” Such believers have never entered into the great love-mission of the Holy Spirit.

This is an area where you must learn to walk in the Spirit—and not by feelings! Walking in the Spirit means allowing the Holy Ghost to do in us what he was sent to do. And that means allowing him to flood your heart right now with the love of God! “Because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us” (Romans 5:5).

Isaiah said, “As one whom his mother comforteth, so will I comfort you; and ye shall be comforted in Jerusalem” (Isaiah 66:13). Isaiah was writing to a stubborn people of God who “went on frowardly [backsliding] in the way of [their] heart” (Isaiah 57:17).

Tell me—How long will a teacher stick by a stubborn, obstinate student who refuses to heed advice? Not very long! But the prophet Isaiah takes one of the highest images possible among men—that of a mother’s love for her child—and shows us something of the love that our Father has for us.

One mother in our church takes a whole day to visit her son in an upstate prison. She gets on a bus and rides for hours, just to see him for a short while. Such a mother will look across at her son in that drab uniform and see the agony in his eyes—and each trip she will die a little more inside. But she never quits on him. He is still her son!

This is the kind of love the Holy Spirit wants you to know God has for you! He comforts us by telling us, “You once said you gave your all to Jesus. You gave him your love, and he still loves you. And now, neither will I let you go. I’ve been sent by him to do a work—and I will keep doing it!”

There is no true comfort for anyone on this earth except that of the Holy Spirit. This is why you need the Holy Ghost abiding in you. He alone can lay you down at night, as in a warm bed, and fill your heart with perfect peace. He alone can truly comfort you in times of pain and sorrow. He is the one who will assure you, “This comfort is not just temporary—it is eternal!”

Thursday, August 5, 2010

LET GO OF YOUR PRIDE AND BE FILLED WITH THE HOLY GHOST!

In both the Old and New Testaments, the Holy Ghost fell upon people in the most unusual ways! He shook buildings. People’s tongues began to praise him—in new tongues. The Holy Ghost took full control!

At Pentecost he came with a mighty, rushing wind! Fire fell! When the Holy Ghost comes down, things get shaken up (see Acts 2:4 and 4:11).

John the Baptist preached, “I indeed baptize you with water; but one mightier than I cometh, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to unloose: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost and with fire” (Luke 3:16).

Beloved, the Bible makes it very clear: When Jesus comes to you, he desires to baptize you with the Holy Ghost and fire! The Holy Ghost brings fire—a red hot, consuming love for Jesus. Why are so many believers hot one minute and then cold the next, never totally yielded, never sold out? Is it because they refuse to let Jesus baptize them with the Holy Ghost?

“When [the Holy Ghost] is come, he will reprove…of sin” (John 16:8). Could it be that these believers are not convicted because the Holy Ghost has not yet been invited to take his rightful place in them? He is God’s plumb line. Anything that does not measure up to Christ, he reveals—and he convicts us and empowers us to conform to his Word! Truly he becomes our Comforter in this, because as he convicts us of sin, he empowers us to forsake it. That is true comfort!

The Holy Ghost will never make you do anything stupid. But he may come upon you in such a way that sinners may think you are drunk! He is not welcome in many churches because he is thought to be too noisy, too upsetting, too unpredictable!

Wednesday, August 4, 2010

THE HOLY SPIRIT KNOWS WHAT HE IS DOING!

The Holy Spirit does not perform his work in us in some disjointed, haphazard way. He doesn’t exist to simply help us cope with life, to get us through crises and to see us through lonely nights. He isn’t there just to pick us up and pump in a little more strength before putting us back into the race.

Everything the Holy Ghost does is related to his reason for coming—to bring us home as a prepared bride. He acts only in keeping with that mission! Yes, he is our Guide, our Comforter, our Strength in time of need. But he uses every act of deliverance—every manifestation of himself in us—to make us more suitable as a bride.

Neither is the Holy Ghost here to just give gifts to the world. No, his every gift has a purpose behind it. The Holy Spirit has only one message: everything he teaches leads to one, central truth. He may shine in us like a many-splendored jewel, but every ray of truth is meant to bring us to a single truth, and it is this:

“You are not your own—you have been bought with a price. You have been chosen to be espoused to Christ. And the Spirit of God has been sent to reveal to you the truth that will set you free from all other loves. Truth will break every bondage to sin and deal with all unbelief. For you are not of this world; you are headed for a glorious meeting with your espoused and are being readied for his marriage supper. All things are now ready and I am preparing you! I want to present you spotless, with a passionate love in your heart for him.”

That’s the work of the Holy Spirit—to manifest Jesus to the church, so that we will fall in love with him. And that love will keep us!

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

THE HOLY GHOST IS RECEIVED BY FAITH!

“This only would I learn of you, Received ye the Spirit by the works of the law, or by the hearing of faith?” (Galatians 3:2). Saints, this message should ignite your faith, and by faith you should lay hold of God’s great promises! “Let him ask in faith, nothing wavering. For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed. For let not that man think that he shall receive any thing of the Lord” (James 1:6–7).

Have you asked God for this gift? Are you seeking the Holy Ghost? Are you continually knocking? “If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children: how much more shall your heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to them that ask him?” (Luke 11:13).

Simply ask and you will receive! Seek your heavenly Father for the baptism of the Holy Ghost and he will give it to you!

We face a mad devil on the loose in our world today. He is unleashing all the power at his command, and legions of evil powers are digging in for the final conflict with heaven. But Satan cannot stand up to a righteous, Holy Ghost-filled child of God who walks in faith and obedience. Show me a truly Holy Ghost-possessed believer and I’ll show you one who puts the legions of hell to chase.

God, send the Holy Ghost! Fall upon us! Baptize us mightily. And send us forth against satanic strongholds with an uncompromising faith that he will prevail in our day!

The apostle Paul said, “Walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfil the lust of the flesh” (Galatians 5:16). He also said, “If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit” (5:25).

As Christians, we have heard this phrase throughout our lives: “Walk in the Spirit.” Many believers tell me they walk in the Spirit—yet they cannot tell me what that truly means. Now, let me ask you: Do you walk and live in the Spirit? And what does that mean to you?

I believe “walking in the Spirit” can be defined in one sentence: Walking in the Spirit is simply allowing the Holy Spirit to do in us what God sent him to do.

I believe you cannot allow him to do that work until you understand why God sent the Holy Spirit.

The Holy Ghost has been sent down to us from the Father to accomplish one (and only one) eternal purpose. And unless we understand his mission and work in us, we will make one of two mistakes: One, we will settle for a small portion of his work—such as a few of the spiritual gifts—mistakenly thinking this is all of him and missing the grand work of his eternal purpose in our lives. Or, two, we will quench the Spirit within us and ignore him completely, believing he’s mysterious and that his presence is something we must take by faith and never understand.

The Holy Spirit has come to dwell in you and me to seal, sanctify, empower and prepare us—he has been sent into our world to prepare a bride for marriage to Christ!

An Old Testament type of this relationship between believers and the Holy Spirit is found in Genesis 24. Abraham sent his eldest servant Eliezer to find a bride for his son Isaac. Eliezer’s name means “mighty, divine helper”—a type of the Holy Spirit. And just as surely as this mighty helper came back with Rebekah to present her as a bride to Isaac, likewise the Holy Spirit will not fail to bring back a bride for our Lord Jesus Christ.

God chose Rebekah as a bride for Isaac—and the Lord led Eliezer right to her. The servant’s entire mission and purpose was focused on one thing: to bring Rebekah to Isaac—to get her to leave all she had, and to be enamored of Isaac and espoused to him. Rebekah’s parents said to Eliezer, “The thing proceedeth from the Lord…take her, and go, and let her be thy master’s son’s wife” (Genesis 24:50–51).

And, so it is with you and me! God chose us to be his bride. Our salvation—our being chosen for Christ—was done by the Lord. He sent the Holy Spirit to lead us to Jesus—and if we trust him, the Spirit will bring us safely home as Christ’s eternal bride!

Monday, August 2, 2010

“ABBA, FATHER”

The Holy Ghost has a way of simplifying our relationship with God the Father and Jesus. He is the One who teaches us to say, “Abba, Father.”

This phrase refers to an oriental custom of Bible days, regarding the adoption of a child. Until the adopting papers were signed and sealed by the adopting father, the child saw this man only as a father. He had no right to call him Abba, meaning “my.”

Yet, as soon as the papers were signed, registered and sealed, the child’s tutor presented him to the adopting father—and for the first time the child could say, “Abba, Father!” As the father embraced him, the young one cried, “My father! He’s not just a father anymore. He’s mine!”

This is the work and ministry of the Holy Spirit. He tutors you of Christ. He presents you to the Father. And he keeps reminding you, “I have sealed the papers. You are no longer an orphan—you are legally a son of God! You now have a very loving, wealthy, powerful Father. Embrace him—call him ‘my Father.’ I have come to show you how much you’re loved by him! He loved and wanted you!”

Our cry should be one of exceeding joy and thanksgiving. The Spirit in us literally cries out, “You are an heir, an inheritor of all that Jesus won.” And what an inheritance you have, because your FATHER is the wealthiest in the whole universe! Don’t shy away from him, he’s not mad at you. Stop acting like an orphan who’s poverty-stricken, lacking joy and spiritual victory. You are not forsaken—so enjoy him!

Not only are we not forsaken but the Holy Spirit is there with us during moments of confusion and suffering.

The Holy Spirit’s mission is to comfort Christ’s bride in the absence of the Bridegroom. “He shall give you another Comforter, that he may abide with you for ever” (John 14:16). “But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost” (v. 26).

Comforter means “one who soothes in a time of pain or grief”—one who eases pain and sorrow, brings relief, consoles and encourages. But I like this definition from the Greek: “One who lays you down on a warm bed of safety.” During the cold, dark night of your soul, he lays you down on the soft bed of his comfort, soothing you with his tender hand.

By calling the Holy Spirit the Comforter, Jesus made an infallible prediction. He was predicting his people would be suffering discomfort, and would be in need of comfort—that there would be a lot of pain and suffering among his people in the last days.

The Holy Spirit brings comfort by reminding you that he lives in you with all the power of God inherent in his being. And that’s why you can say, “Greater is he that is in me than all the world powers combined—greater than all demon powers!” God sent the Spirit to use all his power to keep you out of the clutches of Satan—to lift your spirit, drive away all depression and flood your soul with the love of your Lord.

“We glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience…. And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us” (Romans 5:3, 5).